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2015: Electromagnetic interactions of neutrinos: A window to new physics

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Prof. Alexander Studenikin (Lomonosov Moscow State Univ.) and Prof. Carlo Giunti (Univ. of Turin, Italy) published a review paper that contains a fundamental and most complete review on neutrino electromagnetic properties.

There is the title of a paper by Prof. Alexander Studenikin written together with Prof. Carlo Giunti from the National Institute for Nuclear Physics and University of Turin and that has just published in Reviews of Modern Physics, vol. 87, 531-591 (2015). This paper contains a fundamental and most complete review on neutrino electromagnetic properties, both theoretical and experimental aspects of the problem including phenomenological consequences in astrophysics.

With the observation of neutrino masses and mixings, the study of their electromagnetic interactions has assumed greater relevance both as verification of the Standard Model, and as a guide to new physics. After a standard description of massive neutrinos, this review assembles the present state of the art in the study of their electromagnetic interactions. Possible measurements of their static properties (magnetic moment, millicharge and charge radius) as test of new physics are described, as well as their behavior in strong magnetic fields. A reasonable part of the paper is focused on “electromagnetic” neutrinos motion and interactions in external magnetic fields including particular cases of strong magnetic fields of neutron starts and other astrophysical environments. The main result of the paper is a demonstration of particular importance of studies neutrino electromagnetic properties both for particle physics and astrophysics

Publication of this review paper in the most prestigious international physics journal is an important achievement of the Neutrino Theory Group, which is working at the Faculty of Physics of the Moscow State University under the supervision of Prof. Alexander Studenikin.

This work has been published in Reviews of Modern Physics, vol. 87, 531-591 (2015).